Dealer Outlook

Trade Only Dealer Outlook Blog

Four things “fishy” are worthy of note

You know me — I love fishing. And we all know of angling’s importance to our industry. So, from blasting the National Park Service to a solid partnership to get more women fishing, here are four fishy items worth knowing about that have grabbed my attention.

RBFF boosts fishing prospects in three states

The Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation, the group that developed the award-winning “Take Me Fishing” and “Vamos A Pescar” campaigns, continues to create innovative programs aimed at bringing more participants into recreational boating and fishing.

A tale of two Californias

Ironically, a push to “get the lead out” in California will negatively impact conservation there while the San Diego International Boat Show is set to have a positive impact on the Southern California marketplace.

Fishing management decision is grossly unfair

The more recreational anglers there are, the more that will fish from boats resulting in more fishing-boat sales for dealers. It’s a given and we must vigorously oppose any decision that fails to treat recreational fishermen equitably.

The future of recreational fishing is at stake

Tuesday’s Dealer Outlook called for increased penalties for commercial fisherman who break the law as something that should be considered in the upcoming reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Act. But there’s much more that should be accomplished, particularly as related to recreational fishing.

Stiffer penalties needed for illegal commercial fishing

Red snapper? Red grouper? It’s a red alert for saltwater anglers and the dealers who serve them as we approach this year’s reauthorization of the Magnuson-Stevens Act, the primary law governing fisheries in federal waters. Moreover, there needs to be increased penalties for commercial fishermen who break the law and foreign vessels illegally taking fish […]

ABYC takes lead on invasive species: Part 2

When the American Boat and Yacht Council organized the inaugural Aquatic Invasive Species Summit, it opened a much-needed dialogue on the serious negative impact that invasive species will have on recreational boating and, therefore, the importance of the industry’s engagement.

ABYC takes lead on invasive species: Part 1

Aquatic invasive species are often called a nuisance. So much for understatement. The truth is they are becoming a serious barrier to boating enjoyment and our industry’s prospects for growth and we must become engaged.

Fishing boat dealers should be seeing red

Some say it’s just about red snapper fishing in the Gulf of Mexico. But the truth is it goes much deeper and will set a dangerous precedent for all saltwater anglers and the dealers who sell them their boats.  

Asian carp by any other name are still a threat

I must be traveling through another dimension. I’ve been beamed into a war zone where the Great Lakes are being threatened by approaching armies of Asian carp and there’s no agreement on how — or even if — the battle to prevent an ecosystem defeat.

Never forget the BP oil spill

Sunday was the fourth anniversary of the explosion aboard the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil rig. The passage of time might be fading the memory, but it shouldn’t be forgotten.

RBFF begins to tap into growing Hispanic market

In what is the most intense campaign to date to attract more diversity into the ranks of the nation’s boaters and anglers, the Recreational Boating & Fishing Foundation recently unveiled the Spanish language Internet portal “Vamos a Pescar” that targets the growing Latino market.

Algae blooms threaten boating’s future: Part 1

Not since the 1960s has pollution of our waterways made such headlines. From Chesapeake Bay to the Pacific Northwest, from Canada’s Lake Winnipeg to the Gulf of Mexico, summer toxic blue-green algae blooms have been shutting down recreation areas and constitute another barrier to new boaters joining our ranks.

The millions that boost boating and fishing

Most dealers have heard of it, but can’t define it. Most manufacturers don’t know the details, either. Still, it’s a whopping $600 million program using public funds to annually boost boating and fishing and it’s up for reauthorization.